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Yahya Shrem is now halfway to his goal.

The Cambridge boy is hoping to raise $30,000 – enough money to privately sponsor a family of Syrian refugees. In the first week of his campaign, he raised about $5,800. That total got a big boost on Wednesday, when a Cambridge business donated $10,000 to his cause.

“We have this big company (that) makes lots of money – why not give a donation to him so he can achieve his dreams of getting one family to Cambridge?” said Hameed Mohammed, the company’s vice-president of sales. Shrem says he hopes to raise the rest of the money within the next two weeks. “When I see pictures of the refugees … they’re suffering,” he said. “Over here in Canada, we only think about ourselves and there’s no war happening.”

ctvnews.ca

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